18th Pollutant Responses in Marine Organisms (PRIMO 18) Symposium

Symposium theme: Integrated Solutions for Sustainable Environmental Health

 

Brief History of PRIMO

The International Symposium series, "Pollutant Responses in Marine Organisms" began in 1981 with a small group of NSF-funded investigators who were addressing questions related to "Chemical Effects and the Health of the Ocean" at a mechanistic level.

The first PRIMO Symposium was held in Plymouth, UK, in 1981 with the goal of stimulating international scientific interactions in this area. The success of the first PRIMO meeting led to a second in 1983 in Woods Hole, USA, and then to biennial meetings held alternately in Europe and the United States. Although the word "marine" was used to produce the memorable acronym, the meeting has never distinguished between, and always has included, marine and freshwater organisms.

To date, PRIMO meetings have been held in the following locations worldwide (see below), translating to the outstanding scientific quality of this international forum.

 
 
PRIMO Series
Year
Location
PRIMO 1
1981
Plymouth, UK
PRIMO 2
1983
Wood Hole, USA
PRIMO 3
1985
Plymouth, UK
PRIMO 4
1987
Wood Hole, USA
PRIMO 5
1989
Plymouth, UK
PRIMO 6
1991
Wood Hole, USA
PRIMO 7
1993
Gothenburg, Sweden
PRIMO 8
1995
Monterey, USA
PRIMO 9
1997
Bergen, Norway
 
PRIMO Series
Year
Location
PRIMO 10
1999
Williamsburg, USA
PRIMO 11
2001
Plymouth, UK
PRIMO 12
2003
Tampa, USA
PRIMO 13
2005
Alessandria, Italy
PRIMO 14
2007
Florianopolis, Brazil
PRIMO 15
2009
Bordeaux, France
PRIMO 16
2011
Long Beach, USA
PRIMO 17
2013
Algarve, Portugal
PRIMO 18
2015
Trondheim, Norway
 
 
 
Scientific theme of PRIMO 18:  
Integrated Solutions for Sustainable Environmental Health

Reasonable conservation and sustainable development strategies must recognize that species including - plants, animals, and microorganisms, with enormous associated gene diversity in these species, different terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are all part of a biologically diverse planet Earth. Therefore, sustainable development within environmental carrying capacity and minimal human health risk consequences is a central issue in toxicological and environmental studies and research.

Within the concept of environmental carrying capacity and minimal human health risk, the evaluation and development risk assessment tools should happen simultaneously with new technologies. At the PRIMO 18 symposium, we will convene a group of internationally recognized research scientists (both as invited and submitted lectures) to address research issues related to cellular absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination, ocean acidification/climate change, ecotoxicology of large marine vertebrates, epigenetics, exposome and exposomics, emerging compounds/nanomaterials, endocrine disruption, geno- and phenotoxicity, tissue distribution and immune responses, combination effects of environmental stressors, detection and monitoring of biological effects of deliberately dumped chemicals at sea, ecosystem-level effects, computational toxicology, environmental assessment and biomarkers, Arctic pollution and pollution from oil and gas installations. All these research and scientific issues are integral aspects of global approaches to emerging environmental problems.

The PRIMO conference series has always been committed to disseminating scientific and research progress through the publication of special issues in two international journals, namely – Aquatic Toxicology and Marine Environmental Research. One of the primary goals of these journals is to promote scientific excellence through the publication of scientific studies in different areas of environmental sciences. Furthermore, the PRIMO conference series is committed to encouraging the participation and recruitment of young researchers into the field through the provision of travel grants that subsidizes their participation.

In the last PRIMO 17 symposium in Algarve Portugal (5-8 May, 2013), there were 350 participants from 32 countries, and a substantial part of these participants (about 30%) were first-time student participants.

 

International Scientific Committee

  • Afonso Bainy, Brasil

  • Aldo Viarengo, Italy

  • Anders Goksøyr, Norway

  • Augustine Arukwe, Norway

  • Jonny Beyer, Norway

  • Christophe Minier, France

  • Cinta Porte, Spain

  • Daniel Schlenk, USA

  • David Hinton, USA

  • Francesco Regoli, Italy

  • John J. Stegeman, USA

  • Eduardo Rocha, Portugal

  • Maria Joao Rocha, Portugal

  • Geir Wing Gabrielsen, Norway

  • Karl Fent, Switzerland

  • Ketil Hyland, Norway

  • Richard Di Giulio, USA

  • Kevin Chipman, UK

  • Knut-Erik Tollefsen, Norway

  • Lars Förlin, Sweden

  • Malin Celander, Sweden

  • Margaret O. James, USA

  • Maria João Bebianno, Portugal

  • Michael N. Moore, UK

  • Miren P. Cajaraville, Spain

  • Jae Song Lee, South Korea

  • Charles D. Rice, USA

  • Inge Werner, Switzerland

  • Nancy Denslow, USA

  • Evan Gallagher, USA

  • Ron van der Oost, Nederland

  • Sharon Hook, Australia

  • Shosaku Kashiwada, Japan

  • Bjørn Munro Jenssen, Norway

  • Peter Thomas, USA

  • Rudolf Wu, Hong Kong

  • Cristina Fossi, Italy

  • Joanna Wilson, Canada

  • Janneche Utne Skåre, Norway

  • Amy H. Ringwood, USA

     

  Executive Committee

  Local Committee

  • Augustine Arukwe, Norway

  • Anders Goksøyr, Norway

  • Lar Förlin, Sweden

  • David E. Hinton, USA

  • Peter Thomas, USA

  • John J. Stegeman, USA

  • Francesco Regoli, Italy

  • Daniel Schlenk, USA

  • Augustine Arukwe

  • Anders Goksøyr

  • Åse Krøkje

  • Bjørn Munro Jenssen

  • Randi Røsbak

  • Grethe Stavik Eggen